Bounty Description

Farm Share Bounty

Welcome to the Winter Share! This information is meant to help you store your vegetables until use.  We’ve ordered this list starting with those you’ll want to use up first and moving down the list, root vegetables store nicely so storage times will vary depending on your set up. The refrigerator helps so much, but it is also the enemy when storing vegetables because it steals humidity. Most vegetables like humidity in the 60-90% range. When I mention storing in plastic bags, anything will do it doesn’t have to be a specific type. If you use ziplock type bags don’t seal it all the way as some air flow is good for the veggies. The longer you store your vegetables the more often you should check and see how they are doing. The classic old timey tradition was to sort through the stored veggies and cook up anything getting a little soft, wrinkly or spotty.  

Mixed Greens – Treat like you would lettuce mix, though the greens are larger. This is a mix of three lettuce types and Asian greens. The greens were in the greenhouse and because of the cold didn’t grow large enough to be delivered as just a head of lettuce. These have been washed, though we always suggest giving greens a rinse before use. Store in the bag it comes in, keeping the bag folded over and not tied.  

Carrots- Nice sweet carrots that are frost sweetened. Our clay heavy soils make it hard for carrots to grow perfectly straight causing some variation in shapes.  Grate into a cole slaw, roast in a pan with a chicken or a quick crunchy snack. These will store for quite a while in the bag they came in in the refrigerator. Keep the bag folded over not tied! If they start to sprout at all its time to use them up. Our clay heavy soils make it hard for carrots to grow perfectly straight causing them to tend to look like legs.  Grate into a cole slaw, roast in a pan with a chicken or a quick crunchy snack. These will store for quite a while in the bag they came in in the refrigerator. Keep the bag folded over not tied! If they start to sprout at all its time to use them up.  

Purple Top Turnip – Mild in flavor is a hearty root vegetable that is perfect for stew. It will take on the flavor of any dish you add it to but hold its shape. These root crops do prefer a high humidity to keep crisp. Make sure the bag is folded over and not tied as some passive air flow is needed too.   

Rutabaga- From the same family as broccoli! Rutabaga is a classic storage crop full of good for you vitamins. Though not an adorable vegetable it is lovely in a mixed veg. roast.  Store with your other roots in a bag loosely folded over, to retain moisture.

Beauty Heart Radish- Bright purple/pink interior with a white and green exterior. The radishes are especially mild this year. I’ve tasted many so far and have been impressed with how easy going they are. Perfect for a snack, salad or even roasted. Store as you would your turnips.  

Celeriac- or Celery Root – cousin of celery that develops a small green top, and large root. You can peel the outside but we rarely do more than trim the bottom and top, the skin is very thin and once cooked is not noticeable. Really a great storage crop, lasts well if stored in plastic. Has a mild flavor that’s perfect for any soup, stew, roast, gratin, or hash.  

Cabbage- Green Cabbage can be used in a myriad of ways. A new favorite of ours is cabbage “steaks” either wedges or whole slices covered in cooking oil, salt and pepper (plus any favorite spices) and placed on a roasting pan in the oven till tender. Since the oven is on throw some potatoes in there too. Makes a great side dish and super simple. This type of cabbage will store for a long time if kept in a bag to maintain freshness, any leaves that seem soft or old peel back to reveal the fresh interior.  

Potatoes –Superior Russet. The russets are the classic dry white potato. For shorter term storage, just keep roots in the 40- 60 F range and they can keep for many weeks until they begin to sprout or soften. Keep potatoes in the dark in opaque containers like paper bags or in a drawer or cupboard, as light will turn them green and cause them to sprout sooner. More humid conditions will keep them from shriveling. For longest term storage, keep under refrigeration, or similar conditions. However, if you refrigerate, take them out and allow to come to room temperature. This allows the starches to convert back to normal inside the potato. Potato starches turn to sugars in the cold. You can also eat them directly out of the fridge, though they may be sweeter and have a slightly different texture.  

Onions & Garlic – Yellow storage onions and garlic blubs (they come in the same bag) Store in the bag they come in. Keep at room temperature in the kitchen for medium storage. They like it dry, and on the cooler side (32-50 F ideally, though kitchens work well for medium length keeping). Don’t put in plastic bags as humidity encourages sprouting. You can also keep small quantities in the kitchen and bulk amounts of garlic or onions in a cooler spot in mesh bags or containers that allow lots of airflow. Onions will eventually start to sprout, but you can then give them some light from a window and use the leaves that grow from the center as scallions in late winter sprout salads! Garlic will also keep well at room temp. in a dry area.

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